Fight is on to save Waterlooville’s main post office

The post office in Wellington Way, Waterlooville

The post office in Wellington Way, Waterlooville

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  • Campaigners are worried about loss of jobs and long queues
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THE fight is on to save a town’s main post office.

Residents are rallying round to try and save Waterlooville’s crown branch in Wellington Way.

Post Office announced in January that Waterlooville was one of a number of branches that could close and be replaced by smaller, franchised offices.

But, as a public consultation about the future of the Waterlooville branch approaches, community leaders want to make Post Office bosses aware of people’s anger.

Longer queues, poorer service and not being as disabled-friendly are among the concerns.

Havant’s crown post office closed two years ago and services went into a newsagents in West Street, but some customers say queues have got longer.

Michael Evans, campaign organiser for Stakes and Purbrook Labour Party, which has started a petition, said: ‘The main post office is set to close and to be replaced by a much smaller franchised post office in the town, resulting in longer queues for service and poor disabled access.’

Mr Evans said he was concerned about the loss of jobs, adding: ‘There could be implications on the staff financially, with no great prospects of gaining alternative work in the near future.’

Campaigners are to hold a public meeting – at a venue to be decided – and will be inviting the town’s MP, George Hollingbery.

The future of the Wellington Way post office has been in doubt for months amid plans to redevelop the parade. But campaigners believe a crown post office could open elsewhere.

A spokeswoman for Post Office said: ‘We announced in January that we were looking to potentially franchise some of our crown branches, including Waterlooville, but we haven’t yet announced detailed plans or the start of the six-week public consultation for this branch. We want to maintain a presence on high streets because we know this is very important to people.

‘But this must be on a commercially viable basis – we cannot look to the taxpayer to subsidise our crown branches.’

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