Firm is among the best for interns

DEMO Joshua Reynolds with IBM's Paul Stone, showing how brainwaves can control a car via a computer at the Opportunities Fair

DEMO Joshua Reynolds with IBM's Paul Stone, showing how brainwaves can control a car via a computer at the Opportunities Fair

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TECHNOLOGY giant IBM has been named as one of the country’s top firms at taking on interns.

The company, which has its headquarters in North Harbour, has been short-listed in the National Council for Work Experience Awards, 2013.

IBM has been short-listed for two NCWE Awards. It will compete in the category for large organisations offering long-term placements for more than 20 students. It is also up for the Best Employment Experience as Nominated by an Intern Award.

Caroline Brook, global business services, IBM says: ‘We are proud of our industrial trainee scheme and very pleased to be short-listed for these two awards.’

The firm has become more involved in training outside its headquarters in recent years, including taking part in the Portsmouth Opportunities Fair.

It brought a brainwave-powered car (pictured), ready to inspire young minds and show them what kinds of careers are on offer in the city.

The NCWE Awards encourage and reward UK employers who provide valuable internships to students and graduates.

The short list has been drawn up from hundreds of entry forms, which have been assessed against a scoring system incorporating student support and skills development as well as business benefits.

Around five finalists have been selected in each of the 13 categories, covering the full spectrum of organisations from large and small companies to those in the public and charitable sectors.

Mike Hill, chief executive of the Higher Education Careers Services Unit, which operates the NCWE says: ‘This year marks our tenth anniversary and it has become more difficult to short-list due to the increasing number of high calibre entries and limited finalist places.’

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