Innovation is at the heart of medical business

111632-270_BIZ_MORGAN_SR_4/5/11'Morgan Inovation and Technology MD Sue Clarke with husband and technical director Howard Clarke(left) and Robin Dickens(centre) from Lambert Smith Hampton who helped the expanding company move into larger premises in Petersfield.''Picture:Steve Reid 111632-270
111632-270_BIZ_MORGAN_SR_4/5/11'Morgan Inovation and Technology MD Sue Clarke with husband and technical director Howard Clarke(left) and Robin Dickens(centre) from Lambert Smith Hampton who helped the expanding company move into larger premises in Petersfield.''Picture:Steve Reid 111632-270
Chancellor Philip Hammond holding his red ministerial box outside 11 Downing Street, London, before heading to the House of Commons to deliver his Budget

Leader says the business rate system is still ‘fundamentally flawed’

0
Have your say

TWENTY years ago Morgan Automation occupied only the first floor of a business unit in Liss.

Now the company has expanded so much that it has had to move to a prime spot in Petersfield, has changed its name to Morgan Innovation and Technology, and has picked up a Queen’s Award for Enterprise along the way.

The firm makes medical pain relief equipment – lesion generators – for an American firm, which are shipped around the world for use in hospitals, as well as other medical industry-related products.

Co-owner and managing director Sue Clarke said: ‘It was started by my husband Howard and I in 1987.

‘He’s a designer, an inventor, so we needed a company to exploit the ideas we had.

‘Now we have about 60 per cent of the world market.’

It is for their exports that the company won the Queen’s Award for Enterprise in the International Trade category.

During the past three years Morgan has increased its overseas earnings by 84 per cent and its exports now account for 85 per cent of its annual sales.

Mrs Clarke also believes the company is gaining a vital competitive edge by developing and manufacturing a host of new ideas, in fields as diverse as motor neurone disease, stroke treatment and sleep apnoea.

The firm is now working with medical schools and hospitals to turn ideas from the medical profession into reality.

Mrs Clarke said: ‘We wanted to expand and we’ve started to look at a need in this country, which is that there are hospitals and medical schools who have ideas and they don’t know how to take the idea and make a product because it’s quite difficult to do.

‘If this country is going to pull itself out of the mire it needs a better manufacturing business.

‘We try to source as much as we can locally for our own manufacturing.

‘The British have always been good at creating new products, but we tend to just hand them over to other countries.’

Their expansion has led the company to move. The new premises are more than twice the size of the old, and have ESD flooring, environmentally-friendly heat exchange heating and air conditioning and daylight lighting.