A butcher’s at one of city’s favourite old shops

The shop on the corner of Twyford Avenue and Wilson Road, Tipner. Note the marble slab and open sliding window for the display of merchandise before fridges.
The shop on the corner of Twyford Avenue and Wilson Road, Tipner. Note the marble slab and open sliding window for the display of merchandise before fridges.
The Post Office in Commercial Road on the corner of Stanhope Road 1970s. The Guildhall clocktower to the left.

The much-loved Post Office that’s now a block of flats

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I was after some information in my Saturday column recently and Eunice Conybeare disagreed with what I thought was another use for a building.

We got to the bottom of it all in the end, but Eunice also sent me these photographs of her late father Charlie, who managed a butcher’s on the corner of Twyford Avenue and Wilson Road in Tipner, Portsmouth.

A Christmas display with six hind quarters and two fore quarters. The third hind quarter from the left is a 'short hind' with the four-bone fore rib already cut away. Several gammons are also on show. The board states 'Prime Xmas Beef. Order Now'.

A Christmas display with six hind quarters and two fore quarters. The third hind quarter from the left is a 'short hind' with the four-bone fore rib already cut away. Several gammons are also on show. The board states 'Prime Xmas Beef. Order Now'.

W R Fletcher was the company name and it later became part of the Dewhurst chain.

Charlie was manager of the shop for 37 years from 1932 until 1969 when he retired.

Just imagine the changes he would have seen in his lifetime.

To all the residents of the area, the shop was always known as ‘Charlie’s’ and he had to deal with all the problems of shortages throughout the war.

Charlie Conybeare in later life. His coat and apron could have been laundered  I think. Behind him is a boned shin of beef.

Charlie Conybeare in later life. His coat and apron could have been laundered I think. Behind him is a boned shin of beef.

Way back then, meat could still be displayed in the open, which could not have been all that healthy, especially in the summer months!

Then again, people did not worry too much about such things in days past.

There were very few fridges and people purchased what they wanted on the day to use that day.

After the war, with the introduction of cold fronts and cabinets in butcher’s shops, meat was taken indoors for display.

No doubt there must be several people still about who remember Charlie and his shop. Do let us know.