Arthur’s wartime identity card discovered in chest

191211 REMEMBER WHEN REP: CO''CAPTION: Arthur Gardner's wartime identity card discovered in a chest of drawers
191211 REMEMBER WHEN REP: CO''CAPTION: Arthur Gardner's wartime identity card discovered in a chest of drawers
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Here’s a piece of family memorabilia which was discovered in a chest of drawers earlier this month.

It might not have seen the light of day since the 1950s.

Alice Willcocks found the Second World War identity card wedged at the back of a drawer in a chest of drawers at her home in the West Sussex village of Compton, north of Emsworth.

As you can see it belonged to Arthur R Gardner, whose address was 18, Southwood Road, Hilsea, Portsmouth.

It was issued in June 1940 when he was 42 and his distinguishing feature was recorded as a ‘small mole on cheek, under right eye’.

Now Mrs Willcocks would like to return it to a member of Arthur’s family.

The government introduced National Registration Identity Cards under the National Registration Act 1939.

On the back of the identity card the owner was told:

n Always carry your Identity Card. You must produce it on demand by a police officer in uniform or member of HM Armed Forces in uniform on duty.

n You are responsible for this card, and must not part with it to any other person. You must report at once to the local National Registration Office if it is lost, destroyed, damaged or defaced.

n If you find a lost identity card or have in your possession a card not belonging to yourself or anyone in your charge you must hand it in at once at a police station or National Registration Office.

n Any breach of these requirements is an offence punishable by a fine or imprisonment or both.

If you can shed any light on Arthur’s card, please get in touch.