Barefoot orange box go-carters are kings of road

London Road, Cosham, in the 1920s and, below, the same view today.
London Road, Cosham, in the 1920s and, below, the same view today.
jpns-22-07-17 retro July 2017

Sea rescue - Leading Aircrewman Diver Chris Crossley winches one of the teenagers to the safety of a Solent search and rescue helicopter.

THIS WEEK IN 1976: Helicopter rescues three from sea

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This marvellous photograph was loaned to me by Paul Costen (costen.co.uk) and is a view looking up London Road, Cosham towards the Southwick Hill Road junction which is just out of sight on the far right hand side.

Behind the photographer is the Red Lion pub.

The same view today. The blue rectangle  is where the tram is seen in the  older picture. PPP-141230-103106001

The same view today. The blue rectangle is where the tram is seen in the older picture. PPP-141230-103106001

In the same view today we see great alterations with the fine houses to the right and left all long demolished.

The lamp standard has the letters PIC impressed at the base along with the city coat of arms.

I believe this stood for Portsmouth Improvement Commissioners who had gas lighting placed in the streets of Portsea from 1820 onwards, so perhaps Cosham was included at a later date by the same people.

If this photo was taken after 1925 it meant London Road was no longer the direct route through Cosham to The George pub on top of the hill, as Northern Road opened on May 28 of that year.

Before that, traffic passed through Cosham via what is now Waite Street and High Street, passing the junction with Havant Road and continuing up London Road.

After that date everything passed to the west of Cosham on the same route it does today.

The children are mostly barefoot and a go-cart made out of pram wheels and an orange box is parked by the kerb.

To the left cycles may be stored for those who have ridden out of town and wish to take a walk over the hill.

If you look between the trees a tram car belonging to the Portsdown & Horndean Light Railway can be seen heading south down Portsdown Hill.

It appears the top deck is full on this fine sunny day. Portsdown Hill seems to be much higher in those days.