Book celebrates history of our buses, trains and trams

A double decker Provincial Guy going under the old Fareham Arch at Fareham station with a freight train above ' taken by Fred York on June 18, 1965
A double decker Provincial Guy going under the old Fareham Arch at Fareham station with a freight train above ' taken by Fred York on June 18, 1965
The telegram received by William Halls mother  still upsetting to read 78 years on.

NOSTALGIA WITH BOB HIND: Curse of the telegram: Dear Mrs Hall – your son is dead

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Had you been around more than a century ago, you might have caught an electric tram near the Town Hall in Fareham to visit relatives or go to work.

Over the years, many forms of transport have been operated to move people between Gosport and Fareham.

Tram at Fareham Town Hall, 1906

Tram at Fareham Town Hall, 1906

As an alternative to the tram, you might have travelled by train between the two towns which were on the main line from London to Gosport selected by Queen Victoria for her journeys to Osborne House on the Isle of Wight. In fact, she made her final journey along the line in her funeral train on February 2, 1901.

Trams were replaced totally by motor buses in 1930. The familiar green and cream Provincial buses plied up and down the main road carrying people to work and entertainment.

These reflections arise now as yet another link between the two towns begins.

The Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) starts on April 22 and to mark the occasion, a new book on the links between Gosport and Fareham since 1841, when the railway line was opened, has been published.

Written by Fred York, the local authoritative transport historian and author of many articles and books on trams, trolleybuses and buses, this A4 book called Bus Rapid Transit contains 60 fascinating pages of the local history of transport which should appeal to enthusiast and resident alike.

There is a mixture of 52 black-and-white and colour pictures illustrating the story from the heyday of trams to the launch of BRT.

It covers all the proposals for Light Rapid Transit, with a tunnel beneath Portsmouth harbour as well as the various ups and downs with the projects to provide an alternative to the congested A32.

This Provincial Society publication will be available from April 22 via provincialsociety.org, or you can buy it at local First Travel shops.