Breezy carriages and an audience with Eisenhower

Passing under  Mill Lane arches, Bedhampton a young lad  can be seen looking out of the front window.
Passing under Mill Lane arches, Bedhampton a young lad can be seen looking out of the front window.
jpns-19-08-17 retro Aug 2017
Waterlooville - More than 1,000 homes go up in Waterlooville as it expands to cater for young families

THIS WEEK IN 1980: The expansion of Waterlooville

0
Have your say

Have you ever stared out of a train window, longing to feel the breeze on your cheeks as you whistle past villages and hills?

I have included this photograph on the right as the lad is practising something we can no longer do – poking your head out of a train window.

General Dwight D. Eisenhower  arrives to be greeted by crowds at the Guildhall on  August 9, 1963.  (Eddie Wallace collection.)

General Dwight D. Eisenhower arrives to be greeted by crowds at the Guildhall on August 9, 1963. (Eddie Wallace collection.)

And better than that, cooling himself down – with modern air conditioning on trains it is impossible to catch a breath of fresh air on a warm summer’s day.

God forbid if the air conditioning unit should break down.

This is a scene taken from the arches of Mill Lane, Bedhampton.

I think it is BIL stock he is in – or maybe HAL or a NOL. The Southern Railway seemed to be obsessed with lavatories when naming their stock as BIL stood for Bi Lav (One lavatory in each carriage), HAL for Half Lavatory, as the stock was made up of corridor carriages and compartment carriages, and NOL – no lavatory at all, so tough luck.

Tim King, former Evening News journalist, managed to interview Eisenhower for five minutes completely alone

On the facing page are scenes at the Guildhall on August 9, 1963, when General Dwight D Eisenhower returned to the city for the first time since the end of the Second World War.

He also paid a nostalgic visit to the former headquarters of SHAEF (Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force) at HMS Dryad, Southwick House, Southwick. It is, of course, the home of the famous D-Day Room where the D-Day invasion map is still on display and open to the public by arrangement.

Tim King, former Evening News journalist, managed to interview Eisenhower for five minutes completely alone in an anteroom, much to the chagrin of national journalists.

He asked where he made the decision for the invasion to take place, in a train carriage at Droxford or at Southwick House?

Dwight told Tim: ‘Right there, in Southwick House on the fourth.’