Can you fill blanks in the Corbin family history?

051211 REMEMBER WHEN REP: CO''CAPTION: Daisy Fielder, second from the right in the front row and George Corbin, second from the right in the top row
051211 REMEMBER WHEN REP: CO''CAPTION: Daisy Fielder, second from the right in the front row and George Corbin, second from the right in the top row
The new trackbed for the Horndean Light Railway looking south across the bridge over Southwick Hill Road, Cosham, about 1903.

NOSTALGIA: Ready and waiting, the shiny new tracks climbing Portsdown Hill

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Brian Goodwin is hoping descendants of some of those in this picture might be able to fill in some blanks in his family history.

Yes, despite the stony expressions, this is a wedding photograph and it was most likely taken in the first decade of the last century.

051211 REMEMBER WHEN REP: CO''CAPTION: George William Corbin during his period as mayor of Portsmouth

051211 REMEMBER WHEN REP: CO''CAPTION: George William Corbin during his period as mayor of Portsmouth

The man, second from the right in the back row, is Brian’s great uncle, George William Corbin who was the mayor of Portsmouth in 1922-23.

The young woman, second from the right in the front row, is his aunt, Daisy Fielder.

Brian, who hails from Portsmouth but now lives in Elgin, Moray, Scotland, said: ‘Assuming my aunt is about 20, that would put the date of the photo as 1907.

‘George had two older sons, Albert, who married on July 16, 1907, and William, who was married on June 4, 1907. I presume that the photo is of one of these weddings.’

Brian believes that some Corbin descendants still live in Hampshire and/or the Isle of Wight.

George, who ran the family business of Corbin Boot and Shoe shops in and around Portsmouth, became a pillar of society and was an alderman for several decades as well as a magistrate.

He died in June 1943, aged 83, in a Havant nursing home after a short illness.

Alderman Corbin entered municipal life on March 23, 1904, when he won a by-election in the Havelock Ward and from that time he served continuously on the council until his death.

His obituary said he was ‘one of the first to recognize that the Esplanade, Canoe Lake and Common comprised the ‘shop front’ of the city, and took a keen interest in seeing that the most was made of these features, which were developed into a prosperous municipal undertaking during the years in which he was Chairman of the South Parade Pier Committee’.

It continued: ‘Alderman Corbin was also deeply interested in the provision of a sufficiency of ‘lungs’ for the city and playing grounds for the children of Portsmouth and Southsea.

‘To the furtherance of these schemes and the beautifying of these places, Portsmouth owes a great deal to the late alderman, and to his works as chairman of the parks and open spaces committee.’

He was for many years a member of the Waverley Bowling Club, and in his earlier years ‘took part with great zest in its activities’.