Coals from Newcastle and free cabbages and caulis

HARBOUR Bailey and Whites was next to the green area of the cemetery towards the top of the picture next to the gas holder at Rudmore. It's now the car park for the ferry port.
HARBOUR Bailey and Whites was next to the green area of the cemetery towards the top of the picture next to the gas holder at Rudmore. It's now the car park for the ferry port.
HMS Victory moored off Gosport about 1920

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Recent pictures here of The Camber and Flathouse Quay stirred great memories for reader Robert Oxford.

He was drawn to a picture of the ‘cabbage boat’ from the Channel Islands being unloaded at The Camber.

He recalls a neighbour in Lynn Road, Buckland, Portsmouth, who ‘worked with the tides’ there and often returned home with freebies for the neighbours – cabbages, caulis, tomatoes and new potatoes.

Robert adds: ‘Fraser and White was the firm my dad worked for as a crane driver on the coal boats and as second mate at sea.

‘One week they would go to Newcastle, the next to Cardiff or Newport in Wales.

‘My mum said they did that to mix up the coal to keep the boilers for the power station free from coking up.’

Robert was one of 15 lads who stacked wood on to Bailey and Whites’ lorries after the timber from Norway had been unloaded at Flathouse.

‘Bailey and Whites was where the ferry port is now,’ he says.

‘Under the car park is the old cemetery which was next door.

‘The Bailey and Whites’ quay was bombed during the war. We used to sit outside to eat our lunch and fish from the ruins.’

Robert also pointed me to this aerial picture taken in the 1960s by Portsmouth Technical High School teacher Jim Bramble which shows the old cemetery next to the Rudmore gas holder.