Crunch! But never fear, Eddie’s here to sort it

THEN Looking north, here we see car 44 in Victoria Road South, Southsea, at the junction with Marmion Road.
THEN Looking north, here we see car 44 in Victoria Road South, Southsea, at the junction with Marmion Road.
Opening of the new school by the home secretary in October 1927. The headmaster, Canon Barton, is on the lowest step, on the left. Dorothea Barton is possibly there, somewhere. (PGS Archive)

NOSTALGIA: A red bluestocking at Portsmouth Grammar School

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The photograph of the tram heading south down Victoria Road South, Southsea, in 1916 was taken by local photographer OJ Morris and used by SE Harrison in his 1963 publication The Tramways of Portsmouth.

The track was double until it reached Richmond Road (just behind the camera) where it became interlaced to The Circle.

The same  location today. No trams but white vansgalore. The tram lines are still in situ under the road.

The same location today. No trams but white vansgalore. The tram lines are still in situ under the road.

Interlacing was peculiar to Portsmouth and many of the narrow roads had this type of layout.

It can still be seen in Rugby Road of course.

The whole of the track is still in place under the Tarmac from Albert Road to The Circle much to the consternation of asphalt layers.

A few years ago the road was being prepared for asphalting and the scarifying machine’s brushes were damaged no end by being caught in the slotted rails several inches deep under the old tar.

Angerstein Road, North End, Portsmouth, in the early 1950s

Angerstein Road, North End, Portsmouth, in the early 1950s

The Cottage Cafe has changed names several times over the years.

In 1948 it was the Quiet Corner Cafe run by a Victor Cutts and in 1962 it went upmarket to be called The Singing Kettle Restaurant.

n The picture of the crash, below left, was taken in the early 1950s.

It was in Angerstein Road, North End, Portsmouth, and Remember When stalwart Eddie Wallace is the constable sorting out the mess.

The Portsmouth visitors' guide 1910

The Portsmouth visitors' guide 1910

The picture comes from his collection and contains another interesting point.

Note the bicycle with the number plate. Was that regulation at the time? Does anyone know?

n On the facing page we travel back to 1910 and the Portsmouth visitors’ guide.

As you can see, Southsea was the place to be. We even had a Cafe Royal.

The Albemarle in Osborne Road advertised bathrooms which must have been a novelty at the time and a chef was kept.

And Totterdell’s Hotel offered the free storage of officers’ luggage.

Imagine that today.