Days when you could dawdle with your bike and horse on A3

The Norman St Peters Church with the statue of William III on horseback in the square.
The Norman St Peters Church with the statue of William III on horseback in the square.
Slimming - Carol Stedman, who raised the most money in the sponsored slim, presenting the proceeds to Julie McGuire

THIS WEEK IN 1984: Sponsored slimmers hit the middle target

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Today I have taken a trip out of town to Petersfield – always a pleasant place to visit with its many cafes and restaurants.

The picture above was taken early in the last century, about 1910, from Petersfield Square looking toward St Peter’s Church, which has its origins in Norman times.

A pleasant scene from 110 years ago: looking south along Portsmouth Road at Horndean in 1907.

A pleasant scene from 110 years ago: looking south along Portsmouth Road at Horndean in 1907.

On the left is the statue of King William III, William of Orange.

In the foreground is the market square where a farmers’ market is held once a month.

• The second picture is a further postcard from the Jim Milburn collection. Here we are looking south along Portsmouth Road at Horndean in 1907, yes, 110 years ago.

Of course, it later became the A3 and there is no way pedestrians could dawdle in the road like they are here.

Portsmouth Road, by now the A3, looking south at Cowplain in 1949.                                                                Picture: Barry Cox Collection.

Portsmouth Road, by now the A3, looking south at Cowplain in 1949. Picture: Barry Cox Collection.

The building on the left marked with a cross is, according to the sender all those years ago, the Horndean Methodist Chapel.

• Same road, different location.

The third picture was taken 42 years after the previous one.

It’s still London Road, but it’s become the A3. Again we are looking south, but this time we’re at Cowplain and it’s 1949.

The Hayling Billy arriving at South Hayling in1963.

The Hayling Billy arriving at South Hayling in1963.

The verge on the left would have carried the trams (or cars) for the Portsmouth & Horndean Light Railway.

If anyone tell me the exact location of this scene, please contact me at the e-mail address above.

• Here’s a date and location for your diary: Wednesday, April 26, County Hall, West Street, Chichester PO19 1RQ, 7.30pm.

There will be a film presentation by Alan Wallbank entitled A Never Ending Love Affair which traces the history of the Hayling Billy and the people who travelled on it.

The line, although closed for more than 50 years, is fondly remembered, and still attracts much interest today.

Alan lives locally at Bedhampton and is a lifetime railwayman.

He started work at Eastleigh as an engine cleaner and fireman, subsequently moving to Fratton as a driver.

He first produced the film in 2013 to mark the 50th anniversary of the closure of the Havant to Hayling Island railway line. It has subsequently been updated, runs for an hour and is regarded as one of the best films about the line.

Alan will also show two shorter films – Portsmouth Trolleybuses and Cuba’s Sugar Railways.

All are welcome. The evening will end about 9.45pm following a break for refreshments included in a suggested £3 entry donation.