Elm Grove’s changing face

There's plenty of bunting and flags in this picture taken in 1935 when celebrations for the silver jubilee of King George V and Queen Mary were at their peak

There's plenty of bunting and flags in this picture taken in 1935 when celebrations for the silver jubilee of King George V and Queen Mary were at their peak

Can you name the kitchen maids in this picture which is owned by Robert Scott

Forget-us-not, Portsmouth schoolboys’ humour from the 1920s

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Today we take a look at the changing face of Elm Grove, Southsea, over the past 130 years.This famous shopping street has altered almost beyond recognition.

The evocative 1935 photograph shows how popular it was before the Second World War.

Now here's a true blast from the past as this photograph was taken in 1880. And, below, how the much-loved Elm Grove looks today

Now here's a true blast from the past as this photograph was taken in 1880. And, below, how the much-loved Elm Grove looks today

The bunting and flags are out to celebrate the silver jubilee of George V and Queen Mary.

The carrier bicycles parked against the kerb indicate a more leisurely pace, as do the small number of cars.

Boots’s Elm Grove Pharmacy with its gold-coloured sign high up on the gable is seen on the right while in the background is the spire of Elm Grove Baptist Church.

The road was originally called Wish Lane and as this 1880 picture shows was then no more than a residential street.

The land on the north side consisted of small farms. Ballard’s Fields extended from Green Road to the passage leading to Belmont Street.

Then came Attweek’s Farm, Newton’s Farm and Wish Lane Farm, the last of which extended from St Peter’s Grove to Victoria Road North.

Elm Grove became a top-notch residential area with large houses hidden behind the lines of beautiful elm trees after which it was named.

When the houses were demolished to build the shops there was a huge public outcry, but it was to no avail.

The 1931 picture shows history disappearing as the last of the elm trees are felled in Elm Grove. Again there were large public protests but the trees still came down.

There were still traces of snow on the trunks of the trees and rooftops, for this was February and the south had just had a particularly hard winter.

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