Fresh hot rolls dripping with butter

Triggs  store and looking down St Vincent Street. The bus is parked outside the  boys club.

Triggs store and looking down St Vincent Street. The bus is parked outside the boys club.

0
Have your say

bobhind2014@icloud.com

I am glad to say there is still someone with memories of this long-demolished area of the city.

Wiltshire Street ran from Hampshire Terrace to St Vincent Street. I said I thought the building next to Triggs was a dairy but Trevor Brown, of Eastern Road, tells me I was wrong.

It was in fact a bakery and run by a Mr Fletcher. In the winter, Trevor would enter the shop and buy fresh hot rolls smothered in butter. ‘If I close my eyes I can still taste them to this day,’ Trevor told me.

As a boy, Trevor lived at 13, St Vincent Street. His mother died in 1950 so he was looked after by his grandmother who lived at number 27.

Opposite Triggs was Mrs Tucker who appears to have sold a bit of everything, a little like Aunty Wainwright in Last of the Summer Wine perhaps?

As his father worked in the dockyard he was left to his own devices most of the time although the neighbours kept an eye out, unbeknown to him.

‘I used to buy what I wanted from Triggs. Well. not buy, I used to get what I wanted on tick. My dad used to square up with Mr Triggs at the end of the week, says Trevor. Long gone days, of course.

In the photograph we are looking down St Vincent Street from Wiltshire Street with Triggs’s store on the corner. He was still operating in 1962.

Where there is a gap in the buildings was a bomb site and Trevor and his pals built a den in the corner of the site. The bus is parked outside the St Vincent Street Boys’ Club.

Next door was the onion store where Peter The Onion Man would leave with his onions strung from the handlebars of his bike.

Lovely memories Trevor, thanks for sharing them with us.

<caption>

vincent = Triggs store in St Vincent Street. The bus is parked outside the boys’ club.

Back to the top of the page