From a tram’s first day to a memorial for the fallen

jpns-31-03-15 rw then memorial''Memorial to the 8th (King's) Liverpool Regiment when standing in Grand Parade. It was erected in 1863.
jpns-31-03-15 rw then memorial''Memorial to the 8th (King's) Liverpool Regiment when standing in Grand Parade. It was erected in 1863.
The Smith and Vosper baker's delivery wagon in Portsmouth about the time of the First World War. It was this picture which brought back so many memories for reader Norman Hall.

Still warm from the Gosport bakery, I couldn’t resist eating the loaf

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For today’s then and now we’re remembering something that was made for remembrance itself.

The massive twenty-one foot tall memorial with six-foot arm width you can see in the photograph to the right once stood in Grand Parade, Old Portsmouth.

jpns-31-03-15 rw today memorial''The memorial today in Whitley Gardens, Shaw Street, Liverpool.

jpns-31-03-15 rw today memorial''The memorial today in Whitley Gardens, Shaw Street, Liverpool.

It was testament to members of 8th – the King’s – Liverpool Regiment of Foot who lost their lives suppressing the Sepoy mutiny in the late 19th century.

The monument was erected in 1863 but moved to Chelsea Hospital in 1877.

It was moved once again to Liverpool in 1911.

The epitaph reads: This cross commemorates the services and deaths of 243 officers, N.C. officers and private soldiers lost by the 8th King’s Regiment while engaged in suppressing the great Sepoy mutiny of 1857-1858.

Some died in battle, some of wounds, some of disease all in the devoted performance of duty.

The photograph in the bottom right corner shows the site of the former Portsea Police Station.

On the site we see Linington’s garage, on the edge of St Georges Square, Portsea in 1961.

Part of the church can be seen to the rear.

It looks as if the square has been tarmaced over unlike today where the whole area of the square has had the cobblestones exposed and retained.

On the page opposite we can see a photo of the first electric trams on Portsea Island.

Up until 1901 the trams of Portsmouth were all hauled by horse but September 21, 1901 marked the end of all that hard work for the weary horses.

I bet they were glad of it when the first electric-powered trams were inaugurated in the town.

Many of the first cars – as trams were called – were decorated with bunting as they paraded the streets of the town.

This photograph shows two of the trams making there way through North End.

Can anyone tell me the exact location?