No queues are good news at Portsmouth landmark building

OPEN The General Post Office in Commercial Road, 1978 			     Picture: Barry Cox
OPEN The General Post Office in Commercial Road, 1978 Picture: Barry Cox
jpns-19-08-17 retro Aug 2017
Waterlooville - More than 1,000 homes go up in Waterlooville as it expands to cater for young families

THIS WEEK IN 1980: The expansion of Waterlooville

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Now here’s a rare sight – a post office without an enormous queue and a woman possibly pondering which window to go to, the choice is so great.

t’s 1978 so perhaps each position really was staffed.

SCAFFOLD This street picture is somewhere in Portsmouth, but where? Behind the wooden scaffolding poles held together with rope is a horse-drawn tram. 					        Picture: The Barry Cox Collection

SCAFFOLD This street picture is somewhere in Portsmouth, but where? Behind the wooden scaffolding poles held together with rope is a horse-drawn tram. Picture: The Barry Cox Collection

Most Portsmouth readers of a certain age will instantly recognise the picture above.

It’s a view inside the then modernised General Post Office which stood on the corner of Commercial Road and Stanhope Road.

But like so much of the old institutions which, by and large, worked well, its days were numbered in the name of ‘progress’.

For this building had only a short period of life left before the new main post office in Slindon Street opened and this cornerstone of Commercial Road was demolished.

WHERE? With two cyclists ensuring their front wheels dont get snared in the tram tracks, I believe this is Lake Road, Portsmouth, in the 1930s. Does anyone recognise any part of it?
The interlaced tram track was common in the Portsmouth system because of the narrow roads 					Picture: Barry Cox

WHERE? With two cyclists ensuring their front wheels dont get snared in the tram tracks, I believe this is Lake Road, Portsmouth, in the 1930s. Does anyone recognise any part of it? The interlaced tram track was common in the Portsmouth system because of the narrow roads Picture: Barry Cox

It’s impossible to imagine now, but at one time, before everyone had a phone, 30 telegram boys operated from this office.

STREET OF JOY OR SORROW How many millions of pairs of feet have tramped this street I wonder? Of course, its one of the most instantly-recognisable roads in Portsmouth  Frogmore Road leading to Fratton Park. This picture was taken by Eddie Wallace in 1961

STREET OF JOY OR SORROW How many millions of pairs of feet have tramped this street I wonder? Of course, its one of the most instantly-recognisable roads in Portsmouth  Frogmore Road leading to Fratton Park. This picture was taken by Eddie Wallace in 1961

FLOE I963 I hear you all cry. Wrong. Yes, the sea in Portsmouth Harbour did freeze in that dreadful winter, but this is 1898. One of them might be the former French ship Duguay-Trouin, later renamed Implacable. If it is, you can see her stern gallery on show at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Picture: The Barry Cox Collection

FLOE I963 I hear you all cry. Wrong. Yes, the sea in Portsmouth Harbour did freeze in that dreadful winter, but this is 1898. One of them might be the former French ship Duguay-Trouin, later renamed Implacable. If it is, you can see her stern gallery on show at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich. Picture: The Barry Cox Collection