NOSTALGIA: A snapshot of Portsmouth Harbour life that comes complete with royal yacht

Portsmouth Harbour from Gosport between 1901 and 1906.
Portsmouth Harbour from Gosport between 1901 and 1906.
Bob Sivewright with quick-thinking newsboy Chris Turner

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The marvellous photograph above comes from Christine Bellman who found it behind another framed photograph.

It’s of Portsmouth Harbour from the Gosport side and is full of features from between 1901 and 1906.

The floods of 1929 looking north at Hilsea, Portsmouth, from the top of a tram.

The floods of 1929 looking north at Hilsea, Portsmouth, from the top of a tram.

We know this because on the right is HMS St Vincent which was sold out of service in 1906.

You might have thought HMS Victory, which would have been anchored out of shot to the left, was powerful, but St Vincent carried 120 guns. At the time of this photograph when she was used for boy training, she only carried 26 guns.

To the centre is the Royal Yacht Victoria and Albert entering harbour. The caption says ‘His Majesty’s Yacht’ which also dates the picture after 1901 when Queen Victoria died.

This side of the port bow is the chain ferry crossing to Point, Old Portsmouth.

A further Helen Mabel Smith photograph, this time of the Rose Garden. Lumps Fort, Southsea, 1960.

A further Helen Mabel Smith photograph, this time of the Rose Garden. Lumps Fort, Southsea, 1960.

Between the yacht and St Vincent is the Round Tower and in the distance Clarence Pier.

The number of people milling about suggests it was a weekend.

•There’s a music hall song called Riding On Top of the Car, the car being a tram.

The song came to mind when I received the 1929 photograph of Hilsea, from John Taylor, of Fareham.

Pictured at last Fridays Trafalgar Day memorial service on Portsdown Hill is actor Roger Glancefield dressed as Captain Hardy. Picture: Allan Smith.

Pictured at last Fridays Trafalgar Day memorial service on Portsdown Hill is actor Roger Glancefield dressed as Captain Hardy. Picture: Allan Smith.

We are looking north approaching the junction with Northern Parade. The Coach and Horses pub would be to the right. Two men on the kerb to the left seem to be trying to clear a drain.

In the distance is the garage which is still trading and on Portsdown Hill, Fort Widley stands guard over Portsmouth which had just become a city.

The houses to the right remain and where the fir tree is, is The News Centre.

•Taken in the summer of 1960, we see another Helen Mabel Smith photograph. It is, of course, the Rose Garden at Lumps Fort, Southsea.

Judging by the faded roses in the foreground it could be late summer. The two children appear to be trying to tell the time from the sundial mounted on the stone pillar.

•Pictured at last Friday’s Trafalgar Day memorial service on Portsdown Hill is re-enactment actor Roger Glancefield from Fort Nelson. He was dressed in Nelsonian era officers’ uniform and was representing Capt Thomas Masterman Hardy, the commanding officer of Victory at Trafalgar.

Roger supports Fort Nelson one day a week and is on hand when there are firing days. He also gives talks on historical naval and army uniforms.