Open all hours for a chat and a box of Weetabix

Open all hours - the shop on the corner of Hampton Street and South Brighton Street, Southsea, in July 1965
Open all hours - the shop on the corner of Hampton Street and South Brighton Street, Southsea, in July 1965
Inmates at Kingston Prison, Portsmouth, on the treadwheel which was abolished in 1898.

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How many of you remember this shop on the corner of Hampton Street and South Brighton Street, Southsea?

One of the countless neighbourhood corner shops in Portsmouth, it was one of those well-stocked ‘community centres’ which, along with the pub, were at the heart of these terraced streets.

Hampton Street stretches into the distance in the picture taken in July 1965.

It, and the other two photographs here, were sent to me by David Janes, of Rectory Close, Alverstoke, Gosport.

He says: ‘The pram is parked in the road with a seemingly large toddler aboard who is absorbed by the fully-stocked window with Weetabix and Kellogg’s Corn Flakes prominent.

‘The open door invites one to enter and well-stocked shelves are within.’

David thinks it might have been dustbin day, with a few old-style metal bins still to be taken in – no wheelie bins, no recycling in 1965.

David was inspired to get in touch after reading the Remember When article recalling all the doorstep deliveries that existed in the years before and after the Second World War.

It prompted him to dig out the picture of the horse-drawn Co-op baker’s van. He hopes readers might recognise the road which he thinks might be in the Chichester Road area of North End.

David adds: ‘The pattern work in the stone or mortar over the doors might give a clue.

‘The lovely railings would have gone during the Second World War. This photo comes from the pre-packaging era and the loaves of bread can be seen loose in the trays at the bottom of the van.’

David’s final photograph is of the van in rather a parlous state in the middle of the road.

He acquired it, along with the bread van picture, about 50 years ago and the assumption was that it was taken in Portsmouth.

‘There is a tram track, but the apparent lack of haste to clear the track suggests tram services were not running along this road; so is this Portsmouth?’ he asks.

Please let me know if you can answer either or both of David’s questions.