Photos show motorway work that improved access to city

The fledgling Portsbridge roundabout with the M27 flyover under construction
The fledgling Portsbridge roundabout with the M27 flyover under construction

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The recent aerial pictures of Horsea Island shown when the M275 was being built have tempted David Willcox to raid his albums.

He took these pictures in the early 1970s, charting the construction of both the M275 and the M27 at Portsbridge and North Harbour.

...and the view the other way from Portsbridge roundabout, looking south past the Southdown bus garage and The News Centre

...and the view the other way from Portsbridge roundabout, looking south past the Southdown bus garage and The News Centre

The M275 was opened in 1976, giving a link from the M27 right into the heart of Portsmouth.

A junction was originally planned for a new development in the Tipner area, but was shelved primarily because planners realised it would breach regulations that there must be a minimum of 1.25 miles between motorway junctions.

Before construction was halted, significant work had been carried out, including four incomplete slip roads with no road surfacing, two bridges above the site for the main roundabout, and realignment of Tipner Lane so that it served the roundabout.

Now the plan has been resurrected with the proposed redevelopment of Tipner more than 40 years after the original idea.

In 2001 the Sails of the South was unveiled close to the site of the missing junction.

The 25-mile long M27, running from Portsmouth to Cadnam, was opened in stages between 1975 and 1983.