Portsmouth feels the heat of an exciting era of travel

Portsmouth and Southsea station, 1938 and inset: The station in 1952
Portsmouth and Southsea station, 1938 and inset: The station in 1952

THIS WEEK IN 1993: ‘Despicable’ attack on Armistice Day

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Steam reigns in this evocative picture taken shortly before the start of the Second World War.

The Guildhall, with its minarets can be seen through the steam to the far left of the picture.

Portsmouth and Southsea station in 1952

Portsmouth and Southsea station in 1952

The cluster of little houses on the right shows what the area looked like before the German bombs wreaked their havoc.

The Portsmouth line terminated here until 1876 when the high-level extension to Portsmouth Harbour was built.

It was a move probably brought about by the Isle of Wight’s popularity as a holiday destination, influenced by Queen Victoria’s love for the island.

The dockyard also took advantage of the waterside extension with the opening of the line to South Railway Jetty – a familiar route for royal trains.

The letter PER – Portsmouth Extension Railway – are wrought into the iron roof brackets of the high-level platform.

The second picture (inset) was taken in 1952 on the high-level platform with two schoolboys watching the train pull in.