Revealed: how I bribed a
policeman with The News

A policeman on point duty at Fratton Bridge in the 1950s, doubtless waiting for his free copy of The News
A policeman on point duty at Fratton Bridge in the 1950s, doubtless waiting for his free copy of The News
rw boxing memorial

MEMORIAL UNVEILING SUNDAY 20, AUGUST 2017

Part of the memorial to be unveiled in Guildhall Square next Sunday at 2pm.

Seconds out! Long-awaited tribute to Portsmouth boxers to be unveiled

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I was visiting my sister’s grave in Kingston Cemetery, Portsmouth, last week and looking around I saw these wonderful carvings of animals alongside and over the headstones.

There was also a grave of a naval man with an anchor and cable chain.

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Some of the carving is, to be honest, quite amazing and I would think the cost would be prohibitive today.

Some have been in position for 80 years or more and only show the slightest erosion.

Perhaps it is because they are away from the road and the pollution.

On the right is a beautiful horse looking down on his master Henry Jones, a position he has held since 1935.

Roy the faithful collie sitting on his master's grave.

Roy the faithful collie sitting on his master's grave.

He has survived the war, the winter of 1963 and the howling gales earlier this year.

Indeed, a very sturdy steed.

Below right we see an ever-faithful collie.

You will all have heard of Greyfriars Bobby the legendary Skye terrier who guarded the grave of his master in Greyfriars’ Kirkyard, Edinburgh, for 14 years.

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Here we have a lovely collie sitting alongside his master and he must have looked superb when first carved.

I wonder what his or her name might have been?

He has been lying alongside his master George Edward Hill since 1922.

Some of the features can still be made out, but he is a little worn over the years, sadly.

Although not large, the carving of a dove feeding its chick is just a delight.

It sits on top of the headstone belonging to Elizabeth Jane Vince who died in 1923.

On the facing page we see a a Wright & Logan photograph from the mid-1950s of Fratton Bridge – and what a location this was to watch the day go by.

The policeman on duty controlled five roads and kept the traffic moving at the busiest of times. If there was a wait there were ways of getting ahead.

As a young boy I used to help out at The News office in Stanhope Road and help the drivers deliver the papers hot off the press.

We always had a rolled copy of the Evening News ready and when the officer saw us approaching he would call our queue forward.

As we passed, a paper was slotted into his coat pocket and off we would speed.

Would that be called insider dealing today?

Lovely days.