Saturday September 6, 1997: The funeral of Princess Diana

RW-19-08-11 REMEMBER WHEN FRONT REP: CO''112724_REMEMBER_WHEN_03/08/11''Saturday 6th September 1997, funeral of Princess Diana. 'Articles from The News for Remember When.''Picture: Allan Hutchings (112724-970)

RW-19-08-11 REMEMBER WHEN FRONT REP: CO''112724_REMEMBER_WHEN_03/08/11''Saturday 6th September 1997, funeral of Princess Diana. 'Articles from The News for Remember When.''Picture: Allan Hutchings (112724-970)

Before culverts were installed the Lavant used to run through Havant town centre. Here is a 1914 view along West Street.

Rising of the winter streams which causes havoc in villages

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An unforgettable image at the end of one of the most extraordinary weeks in British history.

Six days earlier Diana, Princess of Wales, had died in that car crash in a Paris underpass with her lover Dodi Al Fayed.

The nation stood still for a week of unofficial mourning.

And then, on the Saturday morning, her coffin was borne into Westminster Abbey.

It had been followed through the streets of London by her two sons, brother, her former husband and ex-father-in-law.

The five are seen here with their backs to the camera – Prince Charles, 12-year-old Prince Harry, Earl Spencer, 15-year-old Prince William, and the Duke of Edinburgh.

Millions watched on television around the globe, but it was special editions of all newspapers which were gobbled up as souvenirs.

On the front of this special edition of The News that day, the headline read simply: Goodbye, England’s Rose – a reference to a revised version of Candle in the Wind sung at the funeral by Elton John.

I, along with several other News reporters, had spent the previous night on the pavement in Whitehall, to record the occasion.

Inside that paper I wrote: ‘Diana’s princes had joined their mother for her final journey, escorting her coffin through a sea of mourners to the abbey.

‘William and Harry bravely took their places in the funeral cortege and with the world watching and mourning with them, William and Harry followed their mother’s coffin through the silent streets of London.

‘As the cortege began its journey, the abbey bell began to toll every minute. The only other sound to break the silence was the slow clip-clop of the horses’ hooves. Even the carriage – bearing a gleaming First World War 13lb gun – had its wheels muffled with rubber.

‘After the cortege had passed them, many people remained motionless unable to speak, staring dazed into the distance and shaking. Even police officers seemed shaken by what they had seen.’

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