Scrumping apples on the way home from Hayling Island beach

Staunton Avenue, Hayling Island, 1908
Staunton Avenue, Hayling Island, 1908
jpns-19-08-17 retro Aug 2017

Vicky - Vicky Sawyer, a one-year-old born without legs and only one arm

THIS WEEK IN 1980: One of the richest babies at Leigh Park

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I wonder how many of you can remember the trip to Hayling Island by train from Havant and then the long traipse down Staunton Avenue to the beach?

I know I can. I did it many times, usually scrumping apples on the return journey as my pals and I had eaten all our sandwiches hours before.

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Here we see the avenue in 1908 long before the houses and bungalows had been built (and apple trees planted!).

The building is still there, but whether still a shop I cannot say.

The marvellous 1912 photo of Horse Sand Fort is one of the four built to protect Portsmouth from invasion. The others were No Man’s Land Fort, Spitbank Fort and St Helen’s Fort.

Look closely and the guns can be seen peeking out from the gun ports.

This  is the old Elim church  in 1960 that stood in Arundel Street, Landport  long before the modern building was erected. (Zena Churcher)

This is the old Elim church in 1960 that stood in Arundel Street, Landport long before the modern building was erected. (Zena Churcher)

I wonder whose job it was to paint the chequer board squares all around it? Some type of camouflage I assume. It must have been a devil of a job and how was it executed? Answers on a postcard please.

Sent in by Zena Churcher, we see a 1960 view in Arundel Street and the Elim Church. A new one has since been built.

Its proper title was the Elim Tabernacle and it was located close to the Hereford Street junction.

To the right was the Portsmouth & District Billposting & Advertising Company.

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When looking at photographs like the final one here, I always wonder how many made it home from the Western Front?

This was a parade of the Portsmouth Voluntary Training Corps parading on Southsea Common on August 21, 1915.

As you can see, they are surrounded by civilians, no doubt many of the soldiers’ relatives.

The chap walking down the centre of the ranks reviewing his troops is Lord Charles Beresford.