Sizzling career of the old Fighting Sausage frigate

HMS Cumberland passing the Round Tower to enter Portsmouth Naval Base for the first time in 1990
HMS Cumberland passing the Round Tower to enter Portsmouth Naval Base for the first time in 1990

Saint Roger's halo didn't slip when he gave me interview

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I know the years seem to fly by even quicker as you get older, but when I found this picture of the Type-22 frigate HMS Cumberland passing the Round Tower and entering Portsmouth Harbour for the first time, I guessed it was taken recently. Then I discovered it was from 1990 – 24 years ago.

Since it was taken, HMS Cumberland, always known as ‘The Fighting Sausage’ after the Cumberland delicacy, has done her time, been decommissioned and sold on to a Turkish scrap dealer.

Servicemen  looking forward to a pint in the Six Bells in Emsworth PPP-140527-103434001

Servicemen looking forward to a pint in the Six Bells in Emsworth PPP-140527-103434001

One of her later duties was to rescue British and foreign nationals from the port of Benghazi during the Libyan civil war in 2011. More than 450 people were evacuated to Malta.

On April 18, 2011, Cumberland lowered her ensigns for the last time in Devonport. She was laid up in Portsmouth Harbour and towed away in July 2013.

Two booklets have been produced about Havant in the two world wars. Written by Ann Griffiths and edited by Ralph Cousins I will be writing more about them on Saturday week.

Havant’s Roll of Honour and Havant in the Second World War are available from Havant museum at £5 each, but as a taster, here is a photograph of some local servicemen outside the Six Bells at Havant, perhaps waiting for opening time.

Bringing  children from school, Broad Street, Old Portsmouth, November 1911 PPP-140527-103111001

Bringing children from school, Broad Street, Old Portsmouth, November 1911 PPP-140527-103111001

And finally we see more results of flooding in Broad Street, Old Portsmouth, in November 1911.

It is entitled ‘Bringing the children from school’ but does not say which school. I know it’s more than a century ago, but does anyone recognise their great grandparents perhaps?