The agricultural lifestyle lasted till well after WWI

This peaceful scene shows the then little village of Clanfield in 1930.
This peaceful scene shows the then little village of Clanfield in 1930.
jpns-19-08-17 retro Aug 2017

Wedding - Sgt Brian Brown and his wife Shirley on their wedding day

THIS WEEK IN 1980: Parachute sergeant’s mum had premonition her son had died

0
Have your say

It’s 1930 and this horse-drawn wagon shows how the agricultural lifestyle had changed little until well after the First World War.

The Leigh Park estate hand-over was masterminded by Portsmouth councillor Frederick Storey who predicted the need for council homes to house the burgeoning population from Portsmouth and its surrounding area.

Horndean in 1939. On the right is the tower of Gale's Brewer.

Horndean in 1939. On the right is the tower of Gale's Brewer.

He arranged for the purchase of the land from landowner General Sir Frederick Fitz Wygram.

In 1901 Sir Frederick had received the Freedom of Portsmouth for his kindness in allowing the children of the town to use his estate for holidays.

This peaceful scene shows the then little village of Clanfield in 1930.

The thatched cottages and the girls in their summer dresses evoke a way of life that people at the time thought would never change. Now that village is a sprawl of housing.

In 1960, Clanfield had its 15 minutes of fame when its old village inn was demolished and the prefabricated replacement – The Rising Sun – was built in a day.

This (below) is instantly recognisable Horndean in 1939. On the right is the tower of Gale’s Brewery, founded by farmer and landowner Richard Gale when he bought The Ship and Bell Inn (the white building on the right) in 1847.

The inn already had an established brewing business, but Richard saw further potential.

The company was registered in April 1888 in the name of Richard’s son George, who was 60 at the time. And it was his name the company carried until it was taken over by Fuller’s in 2005.

The company was registered under the then new Companies Registration Act and, until the takeover, was one of only 50 surviving from the first 1,000 registered.