The barn guaranteed to bring tears to your eyes

The onion-drying barn at Green Lane farm, Gosport PPP-140327-164623001
The onion-drying barn at Green Lane farm, Gosport PPP-140327-164623001
Opening of the new school by the home secretary in October 1927. The headmaster, Canon Barton, is on the lowest step, on the left. Dorothea Barton is possibly there, somewhere. (PGS Archive)

NOSTALGIA: A red bluestocking at Portsmouth Grammar School

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You can almost smell the picture on the right. It might also bring tears to your eyes.

For this was a barn on a market garden at Gosport used to dry off thousands of onions.

The photograph comes from John Nisbet, of The Chase, Gosport, as do all the images on this page.

The farm belonged to his great grandfather and could be found in Green Lane, Hardway.

The pictures are believed to date from the early years of the 20th century, before the First World War.

John thinks his great-grandfather sold much of the produce at market in Portsmouth.

But the farm disappeared when it was compulsorily purchased by the Royal Navy to expand nearby Priddy’s Hard.

But with the money John’s great-grandfather, who was allowed to live on the land for the rest of his life as part of the deal, was able to build a row of terraced houses.

It was known as Drumlanrig Terrace and apparently several members of the Nisbet family took up residence in the street.

The picture at the bottom of the page shows the remains of the Second World War motor minesweeper MMS 113 on the foreshore near Priddy’s Hard.

John recently saw a more up-to-date picture of her in The News in which she appeared far more dilapidated and thought readers would be interested to see her in a more complete state.