The brave men who risked their lives to save others

The Hayling Island lifeboat, Proctor, which served the island between 1914 and 1924. Picture: costen.co.uk

The Hayling Island lifeboat, Proctor, which served the island between 1914 and 1924. Picture: costen.co.uk

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Three men in this picture appear to be wearing uniforms dating from about the time of the First World War.

They and their colleagues in the boat were the crew of the third Hayling Island lifeboat, Proctor, which served the island and the eastern Solent from 1914 until 1924.

The Hayling Island Ferry. Picture: costen.co.uk

The Hayling Island Ferry. Picture: costen.co.uk

A new boat house had to be built to house Proctor and the

new station was built next to the coastguard station, about two miles east of the former lifeboat station.

The island got its first lifeboat in 1865 after a number of wrecks occurred off Hayling.

One was that of the Ocean

when a Major Festing led 12 Hayling fishermen to rescue its crew.

The rescue prompted the Rev Charles Hardy to alert the Royal National Lifeboat Institution, which had been formed in 1824, saying the island needed a lifeboat.

And on September 13, 1865, the lifeboat station was opened and a new self-righting lifeboat was named Olive Leaf.

In 1888 a new lifeboat, Charlie and Adrian, was built for Hayling Island by Hanson & Sons at Cowes to replace Olive Leaf.

She saw service until 1914 when Proctor served the island until Hayling RNLI closed in 1924 and the boat went to Cowes for a refit before being sent to Berwick-upon-Tweed.

The second picture here shows the Hayling Ferry plying across the entrance to Langstone Harbour.

And judging by the clothes worn by the passengers, it looks as though the picture was taken after the Second World War.

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