The eyes have it... for a glimpse of distant landmark cupolas

A collection of cupolas on the roof of the University of Portsmouths Park Building in King Henry I Street.
A collection of cupolas on the roof of the University of Portsmouths Park Building in King Henry I Street.
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Strange isn’t it, how often a childhood affliction can be turned into a lifelong benefit?

Take regular Remember When contributor Simon Hart for instance. As a youngster he had to wear an eye patch to strengthen his lazy other eye.

Simon Harts picture of the cupola from the old Queen Alexandra Hospital building. Does anyone have a picture of it in its original position?

Simon Harts picture of the cupola from the old Queen Alexandra Hospital building. Does anyone have a picture of it in its original position?

‘It was not all bad though as my farsightedness meant I could see bus numbers before anyone else at the stop,’ he says.

He remembers that at Red Barn Junior School, Portchester, pupils were encouraged to study the architecture of High Street buildings.

‘My ability to see far away meant cupolas caught my long-sighted eye. I did not know the word for them then. Cupolas are all around us as an enriching architectural feature but I think the one on the tower of Portsmouth Cathedral was my favourite with its model of a ship atop.’‘

He names examples such as Cosham library; Natwest Bank, West Street Fareham; St George’s Church, Portsea, and the National Museum of the Royal Navy, Portsmouth Historic Dockyard.

The cupola on the National Museum of the Royal Navy in the Historic Dockyard, Portsmouth...

The cupola on the National Museum of the Royal Navy in the Historic Dockyard, Portsmouth...

And during a recent visit to a friend in Queen Alexandra Hospital, Cosham, Simon spotted the cupola from the old hospital which is now a feature in the grounds.

He asks: ‘Can your readers provide a picture of this cupola in situ, please, as it would be really interesting to see?’