Totterdell’s – a family hotel in Portsmouth wrecked by the Luftwaffe

The blitzed Totterdell's Family Hotel  on the corner of  St George's Square and Ordnance Row, 1946
The blitzed Totterdell's Family Hotel on the corner of St George's Square and Ordnance Row, 1946
Two clerks on duty in James Taylors offices in Old Portsmouth. 			 (Robert James collection)

BOB HIND: How ways of doing business have changed from the old days

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Here we see a picture of Totterdell’s Family Hotel at the junction of St George’s Square and Ordnance Row, Portsea, a year after the end of the Second World War.

After a century of trading it ceased business when it was destroyed by the Luftwaffe.

The same scene today.

The same scene today.

To the far right can be seen the Eagle Tavern and the brick building with SWS (Static Water Supply) emblazoned on its wall, was a communal bomb shelter.

To the distant left the road leads to The Hard.

Above the trees you can make out the Odeon-style Southern Railway signal box which was still in use at that time.

Tram lines, not used since 1936, still line the street.

The picture is taken from Anthony Triggs’ book Portsmouth – A Shattered City.

After Totterdell’s Hotel was demolished the local firm of Linninton’s car dealers and garage was built on the site.

This has since been demolished and a memorial to Isambard Kingdom Brunel, the constructor of much of the Great Western Railway and world-famous ship builder, is located on the site.

Brunel was born nearby in Britain Street in 1806.

The Eagle pub has now been converted into a home.

The signal box is still standing but long since taken out of use.

The tram lines may have been lifted but perhaps remain under inches of Tarmac as they do in many parts of Portsmouth to this day.