Trainee bunting tossers

On a misty winter's morning, trainee signalmen learn the system. Notice the gunners' gaiters, double the length of normal dress gaiters. There also seems to be someone on jankers (punishment) sweeping the parade ground at the rear of the photo
On a misty winter's morning, trainee signalmen learn the system. Notice the gunners' gaiters, double the length of normal dress gaiters. There also seems to be someone on jankers (punishment) sweeping the parade ground at the rear of the photo
jpns-19-08-17 retro Aug 2017

Wedding - Sgt Brian Brown and his wife Shirley on their wedding day

THIS WEEK IN 1980: Parachute sergeant’s mum had premonition her son had died

0
Have your say

In this photo we see young trainee signalmen learning their trade from the instructor standing to the left. They were always nick-named ‘bunting tossers’ within the navy.

The semaphore flag signalling system is or was based on waving a pair of hand-held flags. The letter the boys are signalling is ‘N’ or, if they waved their arms up and down above their heads in quick succession, it would mean ‘error.’

No doubt these boys were trained to a very high standard before they joined the fleet as at the time they were only two ways to make contact with another ship – by flags or Morse code with an Aldis lamp, another form of signalling at great distances.

No doubt these boys had to learn how to use the lamp as well.