Trolleybus ride into heart of a throbbing Portsmouth

ALL ABOARD A photo that would be impossible to take today  the Guildhall from Greetham Street.   Picture: Barry Cox

ALL ABOARD A photo that would be impossible to take today  the Guildhall from Greetham Street. Picture: Barry Cox

Apart from Victoria Pier and the steam ferry this is a scene that would have been familiar to Nelson.

A harbour view that would have been familiar to Horatio Nelson

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Above is a view it would be impossible to photograph today because of the demolition and seismic redevelopment of the centre of Portsmouth that occurred in the early 1970s.

Trolley and motor buses fill the scene which shows the Guildhall from Greetham Street in 1963.

COMMERCIAL With Littlewoods, Woolworths and C&A all doing good trade, this is Commercial Road, Portsmouth, looking south in 1961. You can see dozens of cycles propped against the kerb in days when they were unlikely to be stolen.

COMMERCIAL With Littlewoods, Woolworths and C&A all doing good trade, this is Commercial Road, Portsmouth, looking south in 1961. You can see dozens of cycles propped against the kerb in days when they were unlikely to be stolen.

My colleague Bob Hind remembers, as a boy, travelling upstairs at the front of a trolleybus and passing along Greetham Street to the junction of Guildhall Square alongside the Sussex Hotel on the left.

He says: ‘At once this amazing vista opened up in front of the bus with the wonderful square packed with people, cars and buses. Great memories.’

To the left of the photograph were, believe it or not, butchers’ wholesalers Swift & Co, Towers & Co, Armour & Co and the Chichester Meat Company all vying for trade.

It seems as if we are talking about the 19th century, but it was all there until the late 1960s.

PRECINCT A 1965 view of Havant precinct from the steps leading to the railway station. The concrete mushrooms were a fountain. Unfortunately hooligans thought it a playground and within months they were full of rubbish and the water stopped running.
They were later dismantled. 
The area to the left  is planned to be  demolished  and a high rise block built on the site.

PRECINCT A 1965 view of Havant precinct from the steps leading to the railway station. The concrete mushrooms were a fountain. Unfortunately hooligans thought it a playground and within months they were full of rubbish and the water stopped running. They were later dismantled. The area to the left is planned to be demolished and a high rise block built on the site.

BYE-BYE BILLY The train crew and platform staff after the last Hayling Billy arrived at Havant station in 1963. This picture was not taken to mark the final scheduled passenger train, but for a special that ran two days after the lines controversial closure on Sunday, November 3, 1963.
The only person my colleague Bob Hind recognises here is a young John Arter, fifth from the left. If you can name any others we would be pleased to hear from you.     Picture: Barry Cox



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BYE-BYE BILLY The train crew and platform staff after the last Hayling Billy arrived at Havant station in 1963. This picture was not taken to mark the final scheduled passenger train, but for a special that ran two days after the lines controversial closure on Sunday, November 3, 1963. The only person my colleague Bob Hind recognises here is a young John Arter, fifth from the left. If you can name any others we would be pleased to hear from you. Picture: Barry Cox --

VIBRANT Following on from the picture above, here we are looking at Guildhall Square with Greetham Street coming in from the right. The Sussex Hotel is on the corner. The photographer was standing on the corner of Russell Street with the statue of Queen Victoria behind him.

VIBRANT Following on from the picture above, here we are looking at Guildhall Square with Greetham Street coming in from the right. The Sussex Hotel is on the corner. The photographer was standing on the corner of Russell Street with the statue of Queen Victoria behind him.

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