We’re now on the slippery slope to winter, so here’s a reminder from Portsmouth

A reversal of the present weather, here we see traffic at a standstill on the summit of Portsdown Hill, 1941.
A reversal of the present weather, here we see traffic at a standstill on the summit of Portsdown Hill, 1941.

THIS WEEK IN 1993: Royal Navy brings in drugs booty

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There are many photographs taken from the Gosport side of Portsmouth Harbour but not many at ground level like the one on the facing page.

The chain ferry from Point, Old Portsmouth, to Gosport has arrived and a Wolseley motor car is just offloading.

In a much-changed scene looking across the harbour to Portsmouth from Gosport, the power station, this old Gosport ferry, the floating bridge and the Wolseley have all passed into history.

In a much-changed scene looking across the harbour to Portsmouth from Gosport, the power station, this old Gosport ferry, the floating bridge and the Wolseley have all passed into history.

There were two chain ferries, Alexandra and Duke of York, but I cannot tell which one is seen here.

A fully-loaded ferry from Portsmouth Harbour station is arriving at the pontoon.

On the Portsmouth side you can see one of the the chimneys of the giant power station which dominated the city’s skyline for so long.

Also visible are several pubs at Point, and the Round Tower is on the far right.

Steam gallopers (roundabouts) make up all the fun of the fair in this travelling showmens fair at Wickham, circa 1946.

Steam gallopers (roundabouts) make up all the fun of the fair in this travelling showmens fair at Wickham, circa 1946.

•The picture on the right shows a complete reversal of the weather we’ve all enjoyed/endured this week.

Here we see transport unable to move because of the skating rink-like conditions on the summit of Portsdown Hill back in 1941, the third winter of the Second World War.

The buses had been dispersed the previous evening but when it came for them to return in the morning there was no way they could descend down the hill to Cosham.

•It was not all that long ago when a trip to Ryde from Portsmouth was a day out in itself, without even going on any farther when you arrived at the pierhead.

With all the fine weather we have been having, the open-decked Ryde would have been perfect for a good day out.

With all the fine weather we have been having, the open-decked Ryde would have been perfect for a good day out.

Just to get off and immediately board again for the return trip across the Solent was a day out.

There was always a good cup of tea to be had, but the best part was sitting in the open air on the upper deck.

This is the paddle steamer Ryde, a mainstay of the service from Portsmouth along with the diesel boats.

When they brought in new ships the operating company said they would be much faster.

So what? Who was in a hurry going to the Isle of Wight. If the journey was 40 minutes or half that time, it didn’t matter. It was the quality of the trip that counted of course.

These big steamers offered that by the bagful.

•I know we still have Wickham Horse Fair every year but whether it was held in conjunction with a traditional funfair I cannot say.

It certainly seems very busy in this wonderfully atmospheric picture.

I wonder if any of the steam gallopers are the same as those that are at the Hollycombe steam fair near Liphook?

A very busy scene, which I believe was captured in 1946.