With her bottom scraped, Foudroyant has years ahead

Foudroyant in dry dock in Portsmouth
Foudroyant in dry dock in Portsmouth
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Iam not sure how old this photograph is but as can just about be seen, it is the Foudroyant on the stocks in dry dock in Portsmouth dockyard.

Her hull has been scraped and polished for more years’ service.

Passing Cosham signal box in 1950 we see a West Country/Battle of Britain class locomotive at the head of a train from the west.

Passing Cosham signal box in 1950 we see a West Country/Battle of Britain class locomotive at the head of a train from the west.

She was launched in 1817 and while anchored in Portsmouth Harbour she was the oldest ship afloat.

She is now in Hartlepool, beautifully restored as a museum ship and looking like she was only recently commissioned. She now goes by her proper name HMS Trincomalee.

Is there anyone still about who worked on her and can date this photograph?

In the picture at the foot of the page we see a train passing Cosham signal box. The engine is a light Pacific and is pulling a train from the west country.

High Street, Cosham in January 1976

High Street, Cosham in January 1976

It is either a West Country or Battle of Britain class, but it’s impossible to make out the number to confirm. The railway cottages to the left of the signal box have been demolished, as has the box.

The same view of High Street, Cosham today with The Ship pub, which once dominated this part of the street scene, long gone. Both pictures come from Philip Pyke, of Westowod Road, Hilsea

The same view of High Street, Cosham today with The Ship pub, which once dominated this part of the street scene, long gone. Both pictures come from Philip Pyke, of Westowod Road, Hilsea

AMPHIBIAN Graham Stevens sent me this picture which he took in the mid-1960s when he was crossing Portsmouth Harbour to the Camber where the old slip for the Isle of Wight ferry was. It was a rare sight then, let alone now. He says: Looks like the bank manager was having a trip out during his lunch hour, and no lifejackets.Bet he didnt ask the Queens Harbourmaster for permission to cross the harbour, and if he did they probably would have thought it was a wind-up.

AMPHIBIAN Graham Stevens sent me this picture which he took in the mid-1960s when he was crossing Portsmouth Harbour to the Camber where the old slip for the Isle of Wight ferry was. It was a rare sight then, let alone now. He says: Looks like the bank manager was having a trip out during his lunch hour, and no lifejackets.Bet he didnt ask the Queens Harbourmaster for permission to cross the harbour, and if he did they probably would have thought it was a wind-up.