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Pupils give gifts to the children of the world with shoebox appeal

Children at Crofton Hammond Junior School in Stubbington, have been collecting gifts for their Christmas shoebox appeal. 

Pictured is: (back l-r) Emily Charter (8), Oliver Ashworth (9) and Tara Adams (8) with (front l-r) Lara Stickler (9), Lucas Richardson (7), Jessica Ellan-Speed (7), Jasper Monks (7) and Cadan Plasa (10) with their shoe boxes.

Picture: Sarah Standing (123593-2671)

Children at Crofton Hammond Junior School in Stubbington, have been collecting gifts for their Christmas shoebox appeal. Pictured is: (back l-r) Emily Charter (8), Oliver Ashworth (9) and Tara Adams (8) with (front l-r) Lara Stickler (9), Lucas Richardson (7), Jessica Ellan-Speed (7), Jasper Monks (7) and Cadan Plasa (10) with their shoe boxes. Picture: Sarah Standing (123593-2671)

Pupils at Crofton Hammond Junior School in Stubbington have been wrapping up shoeboxes full of presents for scores of disadvantaged children across the globe. Headteacher Ali Russell explains why they took part.

We feel it’s important that our children are aware of the importance of helping others.

So every year we organise our Shoebox Appeal with Fareham Meon Rotary Club to allow the children the chance to put a smile on a child’s face by giving them a box full of gifts this Christmas.

The boxes are delivered to disadvantaged children in Albania, Montenegro, Tanzania, Moldova and the Philippines.

They are for either a boy or a girl and there are different age groups.

The idea is that they put a label on top of each box saying if it’s for a boy or a girl and what sort of age it is appropriate for.

The children seem to get behind it as it’s about giving and sharing, especially when we are in an environment where our children will have a lovely Christmas.

It’s nice that they take the time to wrap their own gifts – it’s a good thing for them to be doing.

They are ever such nice children here and they do an awful lot of charity work.

They also want to do something for Children in Need.

They want to give to other people because they realise how lucky they are.

They do think about global citizenship.

It’s about thinking about global citizens and not just people who are in Stubbington.

Wrapping a present for somebody is quite a personal thing to do regardless of whether you know that person or not.

It’s not just about charity, it’s about choosing somebody to wrap a present for.

The Rotary Club come in and tell us where the presents get delivered to so they see the effect that it has.

Then they arrange to come and collect the boxes and send them off in time for Christmas.

This is one of the most supported charities.

This term we have already done some work with the Macmillan coffee morning. This is something that we do every year.

They enjoy thinking about other things.

I think it’s very good for them to realise that everybody is different and everybody has different needs, but wrapping a present is universal.

Some of our staff have done a box as well

 

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