Console Corner: Saving video game history... starting with Mega Man

Digital Eclipse's first project is Mega Man Legacy Collection

Digital Eclipse's first project is Mega Man Legacy Collection

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Game development studio Digital Eclipse has vowed to “save video game history” after rising from the ashes of its arcade conversion roots.

The firm has been resurrected with a new focus on preserving video game history and will start the ball rolling with the Mega Man Legacy Collection.

It will feature the six original titles in the seminal action game series which will see each game restored to a playable state from their original source elements.

They will also feature vintage artefacts dating back to the first game’s publication in 1987.

The collection is being published by series creator Capcom and will be playable for the first time at the E3 Expo this week.

Originally formed in 1992 by CEO Andrew Ayre, Digital Eclipse was the first development studio to bring perfectly emulated arcade classics to new platforms.

In its return, the brand ups the ante with a greater restorative focus not only bringing classic games to today’s platforms, but supplementing them with a comprehensive development history.

Supported by rare concept pieces and other archival materials, Digital Eclipse-branded products will offer an unparalleled collector’s edition experience for fans of vintage games.

“Movies have the Criterion Collection, but there hasn’t been anything like that for games,” said Frank Cifaldi, head of restoration for Digital Eclipse.

“We’re living in the golden age of a brand new form of artistic expression, and we’re not doing a very good job of making sure our games will be available five years from now, let alone 50.

All six games in the classic series will be rebuilt from the ground up in all their 8-bit glory

All six games in the classic series will be rebuilt from the ground up in all their 8-bit glory

“The more we can do right now to take video game preservation seriously, the safer our history will be.”

“Every time a game gets re-released as a quick, easy cash-in, we devalue our heritage a little bit more,” said Mike Mika, head of development for Digital Eclipse.

“We think games deserve better than that, and we suspect that the market is going to prove us right.”

Mega Man Legacy Collection is expected to be released in quarter three this year.

We’re living in the golden age of a brand new form of artistic expression, and we’re not doing a very good job of making sure our games will be available five years from now, let alone 50.

Frank Cifaldi, head of restoration for Digital Eclipse

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