Attitudes to food have become ‘confused’

Dr John Steadman, archivist of Portsmouth History Centre based at Portsmouth Central Library     Picture:  Malcolm Wells

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If you’ve tried every diet under the sun, only to see the weight creep back on again when the biscuits appear at work, you’re not alone.

People think about food more than 200 times a day, according to Andy Puddicombe, author of The Headspace Diet.

And our thoughts are not always healthy ones, often tied up with emotions and anxiety about our body image.

‘With over 1.5 billion people in world considered obese, while 800 million go hungry every day, it’s no wonder our attitude to food, and consequently the relationship we have with our body image, is often confused,’ says Andy, a former Buddhist monk, who’s on a mission through his organisation Headspace (getsomeheadspace.com) to promote the health benefits of meditation.

‘When did the simple act of eating become an issue? And how did one of the most basic and primal human needs become such an emotional minefield?’ he asks.

Andy believes it’s time to fundamentally rethink the relationship we have with food and modern-day dieting, and instead adopt an effective, sustainable approach, rooted in tradition.

His approach is known as ‘mindful eating’ and is designed to show you how to find your ideal weight in an easy, manageable and safe way, teaching you how to remind your body of its own natural intelligence and its ability to self regulate. Andy says the techniques are simple and easy to learn, yet potentially life changing.

He adds: ‘It’s not about will power or treating the symptoms, but rather understanding the root of the problem and treating the cause instead.’

The Headspace Diet: 10 Days To Finding Your Ideal Weight by Andy Puddicombe is published by Hodder & Stoughton, priced £12.99.