Born on the day the Titanic sank, Frances nears 100

Frances Weaver will celebrate her 100th birthday on April 15.  Picture: Paul Jacobs (121198-2)
Frances Weaver will celebrate her 100th birthday on April 15. Picture: Paul Jacobs (121198-2)
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Celebrating your 100th birthday is always a special occasion. But even more so for Frances Weaver, who was born on one of the most memorable days in modern history – the day the Titanic sank.

Born on April 15, 1912, Frances shares her birthday with the iconic event.

Frances Weaver is pictured here in her early 20s

Frances Weaver is pictured here in her early 20s

She’ll mark the day with a party at the Haye Corner Care Home in Hill Head, near Stubbington.

Frances grew up in Macclesfield, Cheshire, and was one of 14 children.

She married before the Second World War and had a daughter, Patricia.

The marriage ended and Frances went on to marry Jim Weaver on April 3, 1948, in Macclesfield. During the war he had been in the army and spent many years in a Japanese prisoner of war camp.

Frances and Jim moved to Portsmouth and lived in Cosham before settling in Fareham where they stayed for 60 years.

Jim died in 1995 and Frances lived at home until she was 99, only moving to the care home last August.

For her birthday the staff there will be throwing her a party with a buffet and all her close friends and some of her nieces will be there to celebrate.

Patrica and David Gorrad were her neighbours for 25 years and know her well.

David says the fact that her birthday falls on such a memorable date didn’t go unnoticed.

‘She used to say how if she did something naughty, her mother would say “You should have gone down with the ship”. She was joking. Frances has always had a very dry sense of humour.

‘She’s always been very fashionable too. When she went into the care home she had this small wardrobe but we went round to her house and it was like Marks & Spencer. She had about three bedrooms full of clothes. She’s always been quite a character. She’s like a mother to us.’