Children seen and heard

Children at the drumming workshop, Alfie Carter and Phoebe Jowett (top), John Rance and Rosie May-Carter (bottom)
Children at the drumming workshop, Alfie Carter and Phoebe Jowett (top), John Rance and Rosie May-Carter (bottom)

From broken bones to new beginnings

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It’s not very often that children get the opportunity to make a lot of noise.

But at a drumming workshop they could make as much noise as they wanted to, using drums that originated in different parts of the world.

At the end of the session at the Ashcroft Arts Centre in Fareham, they performed two songs in front of their family that they had created using their instruments.

Olly Corbin, who led the workshop, says it was a good way for the children to work in a group.

He says: ‘We have been working with different drums.

‘We have learnt to work together as a team and worked with all sorts of percussion from Latin instruments to African instruments.

‘They seem to have had a wonderful time. It’s always good to work in teams. It really helps people build up their co-ordination.’

The children used a combination of different types of percussion from African drums to tambourines.

Rebecca Parrant, of the Ashcroft Arts Centre, says: ‘It’s a great opportunity for them. It’s great for young people to be independent and have freedom.

‘And it’s nice for the parents to have a break. It benefits everyone.

‘These kids don’t know each other but they have got on very well.

‘It’s great on many levels. Everyone has really got stuck in.

‘For any children making noise is a good thing, particularly being able to do it with drumming.’