Fairtrade status for community college

Brune Park Community College in Gosport celebrated their Fairtrade status by having a day of fun, concluding with a performance by pupils from what they learned during a drum workshop.

Brune Park Community College in Gosport celebrated their Fairtrade status by having a day of fun, concluding with a performance by pupils from what they learned during a drum workshop.

Kevin Porter

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STUDENTS at a Gosport secondary school have been celebrating becoming a Fairtrade school.

Pupils from Brune Park Community College took part in a variety of activities to raise awareness about Fairtrade products and where they come from.

Some of the activities involved included a mini-football competition, Fairtrade sock-throwing, an African drumming workshop, inflatable banana swimming relays and food tasting.

Pupil Bethany McKinney, 15, says: ‘I thought it was really good because everybody got involved and learnt about what Fairtrade is and how it works.

‘It’s important because they learn about everybody else around the world and how they can make the world a better place.’

Rebecca Moss, 15, adds: ‘It was absolutely brilliant. All of the students got involved. It makes us realise that we aren’t just students who do nothing, we are making a difference for these people we don’t event know.’

Becoming a Fairtrade school means that the curriculum is more focused on Fairtrade issues which are covered in subjects such as geography, and religious studies.

As a result, they will be using specially made Fairtrade footballs during PE lessons.

Mark Smith, Fairtrade co-ordinator at the school, says: ‘The message is that it’s young people and students who go back to their families and talk about what they have been doing at school.

‘So it’s one way of getting that particular message out to the community.

‘It’s looking at children from places like Ghana to see how different their lives are compared to the lives of those in Ghana.

‘They might spend some of the time working on small little cocoa farms. That’s giving a really important message to our kids.’

And Mr Smith says the kids enjoyed themselves throughout the day.

‘They had a great time. The feedback from the students was really positive. And it was a really sunny day which was great.

‘It was really a way of reinforcing that and just reminding them that we are a Fairtrade school and the different things that that means.’

Throughout the year the school will be taking part in Fairtrade activities with a fair at Christmas time and a fashion show with items made from Fairtrade cotton.

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