Friends from far and wide

Lydia Mundy (seated) celebrates  with ex-work friends, care assistants and several of her original neighbours, some who had travelled long distances. Picture: Malcolm Wells (122016-7397)
Lydia Mundy (seated) celebrates with ex-work friends, care assistants and several of her original neighbours, some who had travelled long distances. Picture: Malcolm Wells (122016-7397)
Yachts taking part in last years Clipper Round the World Race			             	  Picture: onEdition

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Lydia Mundy has just celebrated a milestone with her 100th birthday.

Lydia marked the occasion at the Hamilton House care home in Drayton, Portsmouth, and was delighted to receive a visit from family from overseas.

Lydia was born in Vienna, Austria on June 1912. Her mother was a Russian Jew and her father was an Austrian Jew.

She trained in medicine in Vienna, but just three months after she finished her studies in 1938 she moved to Britain with her family to escape the Nazis.

It was during this time that Lydia worked at the famous Great Ormond Street children’s hospital in London. She also worked at St George’s Hospital as a clinical psychologist.

Lydia went on to marry, but her husband sadly passed away in 1966.

It was soon after that she moved down to Portsmouth to work at St James’ s Hospital.

She moved to Drayton where she kept her own house and continued to work there until she retired.

Although she has no children of her own, Lydia is in close contact with her brother’s son, who lives in Vancouver, Canada, and her second cousins in Paris.

To celebrate her birthday, Lydia went to lunch at the Hilton Portsmouth with her family from France and was the guest of honour at an afternoon tea party at her care home.

One of her carers, Lauren Guess, says: ‘We went out and got her some lovely presents, such as a cardigan, and she had a birthday cake.

‘Lots of her friends came that she hadn’t seen in a long time and she also got a telegram from the Queen congratulating her.

‘She had a great day.’