‘I am passionate about helping young people’

This is of some of the main organisers for our link at an event we held to commemorate 25 years since the disaster in Chernobyl'''From left to right: Steve Lunn (CRB Co-Ordinator), Stacy Lunn (Host Family Co-ordinator), Rob Baker (Vice Chairman), Natalie Lunn (Information Manager), Me (Publicity Co-ordinator), Marian Stapley (Chairwoman).'Front: Rosie Lunn (Host Family Member).
This is of some of the main organisers for our link at an event we held to commemorate 25 years since the disaster in Chernobyl'''From left to right: Steve Lunn (CRB Co-Ordinator), Stacy Lunn (Host Family Co-ordinator), Rob Baker (Vice Chairman), Natalie Lunn (Information Manager), Me (Publicity Co-ordinator), Marian Stapley (Chairwoman).'Front: Rosie Lunn (Host Family Member).
Sara Gohl  is determined to be an inspiration to her son. and below,, Sara, Robin, and husband Richard in France before her cancer diagnosis, in 2015

WATCH: ‘I’m not a quitter...I’m moving forward’

0
Have your say

For years, a dedicated team of volunteers have been giving children from Chernobyl breaks in this country.

Members of the Chernobyl Children’s Life Line charity arrange for youngsters from Belarus and Ukraine to come and stay with families in the Portsmouth area.

The volunteers also take them on trips to local landmarks and attractions.

The youngsters get to soak up the sights of the Spinnaker Tower, Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, Clarence Pier and the Blue Reef Aquarium.

They are also taken for a stroll around the city’s parks and go crabbing in Canoe Lake.

All of this is designed to build up the children’s health and give them a taste of fresh air.

Now the charity is gearing up for this summer’s intake of youngsters from an area that suffered the worst nuclear power plant accident in history in 1986.

Stacy Lunn, of Mayfield Road, North End, has been a volunteer for the charity’s Portsmouth and Hayling Island Link for six years.

As family liaison officer, she organises the childrens’ one-month stay with host families.

She also takes in a few of the youngsters herself.

Stacy, 43, says: ‘The idea of the trip is to give them new experiences to take back home with them.

‘It’s not so much a holiday, but a chance for them to build up their health.

‘The majority of them come from areas where there is so much radiation.

‘By coming over here they can easily increase their life expectancy by two years or more.’

She adds: ‘We give them as much fresh fruit and water as possible. It’s amazing because they’re so grateful for it.

‘You really look at your own life and see how much you take for granted.’

It costs £500 for each child to travel to Portsmouth. This also covers all their trips during their stay.

‘We do as much fundraising through the year as possible,’ Stacy explains.

‘We do everything from discos to barn dances, raffles and table-top sales.

‘I give up my own time to do this because I’m so passionate about helping young people.

‘I have two daughters of my own, so it’s that motherly instinct.’

Stacy also visited Belarus two years ago and witnessed first hand the everyday struggle that these children and their families face.

‘It was a real eye-opener,’ Stacy says.

‘I just care about making a difference.’