‘Learning about life in the Royal Navy was our favourite topic...’

EYES DOWN From left, Reese Lewis, Courteney Kargobai, Niamh O'Shea, Curtis Frampton and Alan Thomas. Picture: Malcolm Wells (132010-3143)
EYES DOWN From left, Reese Lewis, Courteney Kargobai, Niamh O'Shea, Curtis Frampton and Alan Thomas. Picture: Malcolm Wells (132010-3143)
Yachts taking part in last years Clipper Round the World Race			             	  Picture: onEdition

‘Team spirit’ will keep us buoyant on global challenge

0
Have your say

We have been talking about our exciting year at Corpus 
Christi Catholic Primary School, writes headteacher Elizabeth Giltinan.

We have been voting for our favourite topic.

In Year 3/4 we decided it had to be the topic, in which we found out what it has been like to be in the navy.

We are immensely proud of our Portsmouth heritage, but some of us hadn’t visited the dockyard, so we thought this would be a great way to find out all about what life was like at sea.

We wanted to discover how sailors lived, and how this has changed over time.

We also wondered why Portsmouth became a naval port in the first place, so started researching Horatio Nelson.

We kick-started our learning when we came into school, to find we were press-ganged into the Royal Navy.

Admiral Haskell, Lieutenant Munns and Petty Officer Biddlecombe made us take part in field gun runs, tie knots for our sails, and take part in life at sea for a day.

We learnt all about Gosport, and harbours, and designed and made our own flashing lighthouses to protect our city.

Then, we made an amazing discovery.

Mrs Munns, our Year 3/4 teacher, is married to a real-life naval captain.

We wondered if we would be allowed to see his ship, HMS Diamond, so we asked.

We were given special permission to actually visit his ship.

Although the navy said that if the ship was suddenly needed somewhere in the world, we would have to understand that.

Thankfully, HMS Diamond wasn’t called away to duty, so we boarded ship, and met the crew and captain.

We even went on to the bridge to see how the ship was driven.

That was very different from the time of Nelson.

We heard how they had to be ready to go anywhere in the world where they were needed. We were so proud.

We wanted to find out about the icy waters of the Arctic, as our ships have to be ready to go anywhere in the world.

We learned all about icebergs and about the materials which early seafarers had to wear to keep warm in the cold weather.

Then, just as we were investigating icebergs, we had a surprise visitor – an inspector from Ofsted.

We told her all about the special coats we had made to keep our icemen cold, and explained what we had been finding out.

She told us we were outstanding!