School turns blue to raise money for food projects for Unicef

CAKE SALE From left, Liam Finch, 13, Lauren Fletcher, 14, Hannah Moase, 14, and Charlie Saunders, 12, with front from left, Rebecca Jenkins, 12, Ellen Watts, 12, and Keris Johns, 12, with some of the blue cakes they were selling. Picture: Sarah Standing (13323-7796)
CAKE SALE From left, Liam Finch, 13, Lauren Fletcher, 14, Hannah Moase, 14, and Charlie Saunders, 12, with front from left, Rebecca Jenkins, 12, Ellen Watts, 12, and Keris Johns, 12, with some of the blue cakes they were selling. Picture: Sarah Standing (13323-7796)
Dr John Steadman, archivist of Portsmouth History Centre based at Portsmouth Central Library     Picture:  Malcolm Wells

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For the last 16 months we have been working towards achieving the Unicef Rights Respecting Award, writes senior curriculum leader Claire Copeland.

It puts the rights of the children at the centre of everything we do.

It’s about the ethos of the school.

They have the responsibility to uphold other people’s rights.

Our Unicef Day for Change’ raised money for essential food projects around the world to ensure that every child has enough food to grow healthily and thrive.

The day fell in the middle of our ‘Rights Respecting Week’ in which we were aiming to raise the profile of children’s rights and responsibilities in our drive to become a rights respecting school.

During the week every curriculum area was delivering content through their lessons to highlight the project.

On the Day for Change we had a blue theme as that’s the colour of our charter and Unicef.

There were lots of activities going on.

School bands were playing songs in the hall with a blue theme.

There was also a ‘blue bake-off’ where students were selling cakes to raise more money.

And we had a non-uniform day where all children had to wear blue clothes.

In the art room there was a whole school pledge which staff and students were encouraged to sign.

The pupils understand that they have these rights unconditionally.

With that comes a huge responsibility to uphold the rights of all the children in the world.

We do lots of anti-bullying campaigns.

When we speak to the children about it they understand more now about why there is that expectation about certain behaviour.

It went really well. It’s been fantastic.

They all know what their rights are.

It’s been really good. They have very much enjoyed it today.

There are lots of other things that we do like personal development days and human rights issues.

I think it makes them better global citizens.

It makes them go into the big wide world knowing that there are issues in the world outside Portsmouth.

They know that they have to help people that don’t have the same rights as they have.

They will all be more responsible citizens and ready for a democratic society in the future.