So a desk-bound existence is to blame for this wonky pelvis

Pictured right: Emma Judd with chiropractor Paul Zalick and personal trainer Max Eacott
Pictured right: Emma Judd with chiropractor Paul Zalick and personal trainer Max Eacott
Dr John Steadman, archivist of Portsmouth History Centre based at Portsmouth Central Library     Picture:  Malcolm Wells

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When News reporter Emma Judd signed up for this year’s Great South Run, she knew she’d need some help. As personal trainer Dawn Grant, from Portsmouth-based 24/7 Fitness, puts her through her paces, she’ll be writing about her progress each week.

It’s not every day a strange man wants to discuss my pelvis in detail. Having never had children, thinking about all things pelvis is somewhat alien to me, and I fail to see how allowing this man – chiropractor Paul Zalick – to manipulate that area will help me run better.

The answer, it seems, is that my pelvis is undeniably wonky. It is, apparently out by just under half-an-inch.

Does this mean I have one leg longer than the other? Does it mean that if I run for long enough I’ll actually start running in a circle?

No, it means my weight is not being carried equally by both legs, which means one slaps down on the pavement much heavier than the other.

Apparently, Paul tells me, this is bad. He also says that my desk-bound, sedentary, work existence is to blame, and once he puts my pelvis back where it should be, my...um...bum muscles need a bit of help.

So in between work-out sessions with Dawn and my new trainer Max, I mainly stretch three times a day to help keep things where they should be. After all, no-one wants to run around in circles.