Students breathe new life into old clothes

Year nine students at Priory School in Southsea spruced up tired charity shop clothes for a fashion show.    Picture: Portsmouth and South East Hampshire Education Business Partnership.

Year nine students at Priory School in Southsea spruced up tired charity shop clothes for a fashion show. Picture: Portsmouth and South East Hampshire Education Business Partnership.

Kevin Porter

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Creative young students proved old and worn-out clothes still have life in them when they took part in a sustainable fashion challenge.

The year nine students from Priory School, in Southsea, transformed clothes that could not be sold by their local branch of the British Heart Foundation into trendy new outfits. They then wore their creations for an end of term fashion show.

Their original designs were inspired by business experts who attended a special workshop organised by the South East Hampshire Education Business Partnership (EBP) around the subject of sustainable manufacturing.

Called PreLoved @ Priory, the day began with a talk from guest speaker Kiki Del Piccolo, from Marks & Spencer, in Portsmouth.

The students then split into teams to accessorise, re-stitch and alter the un-sellable second hand clothes.

Fran Wright, EBP project co-ordinator, says: ‘We are so grateful to Kiki and our business partners, M&S and the British Heart Foundation.

‘The students were given a huge amount of clothing that had missing buttons, torn fabric or broken zips and gave them new life in some fabulous and highly imaginative creations.’

Business ambassadors who volunteered their time to help the teams throughout the day included designer, Linda Canning, Betty Burns from the Federation of Small Businesses and Sharon Ordish, a former member of the production team at Procter & Gamble.

Priory schoolgirl Jordan Beech, 14, says: ‘Obviously making the outfits was fun, but I also learnt how to communicate and work well in a team with people I had never worked with before.’

Roxanne Morris, of Rokii clothes shop, in Victoria Road South, Southsea, gave up her window for a week to display the vamped up clothes.

Meanwhile Springfield School, in Drayton, also rounded off their end of term with a catwalk show featuring items created by the students themselves.

Old jeans and curtain fabrics were transformed into bags while long dresses were turned into trendy mini skirts.

Lynn Evans, headteacher, says: ‘I was so impressed with the students’ designs. It was great to see all shapes and sizes on the catwalk presenting clothes on loan from local fashion shops but also original, sustainable creations.’

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