‘Wonderful’ Edith celebrates her 100th birthday with a party

Edith Reeves celebrates her 100th birthday with family members Diane Brown and Chris King during a party held at the Oakland Grange nursing home in Southsea. Picture: Ian Hargreaves  (122916-1)
Edith Reeves celebrates her 100th birthday with family members Diane Brown and Chris King during a party held at the Oakland Grange nursing home in Southsea. Picture: Ian Hargreaves (122916-1)
Dr John Steadman, archivist of Portsmouth History Centre based at Portsmouth Central Library     Picture:  Malcolm Wells

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Edith Reeves celebrated her 100th birthday by having a tea party with balloons and cake at her care home.

The birthday girl, who was born in Portsmouth on September 3, 1912 and has lived in the city her whole life, now lives at the Oakland Grange home in Southsea – not far away from where she grew up.

After finishing school, Edith worked in a sweet shop for a few weeks on Palmerston Road, close to where she resides now, before she went on to work in a clothing shop.

Soon after she moved to another clothing shop, where she worked as the manageress during the Second World War.

She married her husband, William James Reeves, in 1942 at the Methodist Church in Albert Road, Southsea.

The couple had no children, although today Edith still has family members around her to keep her company and wish her a happy birthday .

Sadly, her husband, who she called Chick, passed away in 1977 aged 64.

Edith lived on her own in Southsea afterwards and only went into a care home around 18 months ago.

Up until the age of 98, she was completely independent.

She’s always had a passion for clothes and enjoyed knitting and crocheting. She would go and buy all the materials and make clothing to give to charity shops.

Her niece, Diane Brown, who visited her on her birthday, says: ‘We had a lovely time celebrating her birthday and the home put on a party with balloons and everything.

‘There was a fair amount of us there to help her celebrate the day.’

Chris King, who is a distant family member, used to visit Edith with his parents when he was a child.

Now he comes to the care home to see her with his wife and two daughters.

He says: ‘When I came down to visit Edith, she would always have a meal prepared for us and she was always interested in what everyone was up to – especially the children.

‘She’s always been a wonderful woman.’