Young sleuths prove to be hot Prospects

Jordan Jennions, Suzanne Lewis, Rhoderick Davies, Andrew Ide, Fran Wright and Aaron Powell. Harry Gatehouse and Ian Thornton, both pupils at Prospect School
Jordan Jennions, Suzanne Lewis, Rhoderick Davies, Andrew Ide, Fran Wright and Aaron Powell. Harry Gatehouse and Ian Thornton, both pupils at Prospect School

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Sherlock Holmes would have been proud of a group of students who used their powers of observation and deduction to tackle a crime scene in one of their classrooms.

A group of more than 50 boys at Prospect School in Havant showed off their sleuthing skills when they took part in a CSI Enterprise Day and attempted to unravel the mystery surrounding the crime scene of a staged murder.

The 11 to 16-year-olds undertook forensic experiments, crime-solving puzzles and workshops designed to uncover the reasons for a fatal poisoning that had been discovered in one of the school’s classrooms.

It was a thrilling distraction from the normal school routine organised by Portsmouth and South East Hampshire Education Business Partnership.

Harry Gatehouse, a Year 9 student, gave a flavour of how much fun the students had.

He said: ‘I had a great time and got to do loads of things. The day was like something you would see on television or a video game and the workshops were really interesting.’

Detective activities were run by the EBP, volunteer Business Ambassadors from local businesses and uniformed police officers representing Hampshire Constabulary.

Sarah Riley, the school’s teacher for personal development and learning, said: ‘This was a wonderful experience for our pupils.

‘They coped well with the change to our usual routine, responded positively and learned a lot of new skills in a practical, enjoyable way.’

She added: ‘We are grateful for the hard work, time and energy from both EBP members and the Business Ambassadors.’

Suzanne Lewis, project co-ordinator for EBP, said the day went even better than she had planned.

She explained: ‘The boys really got into the spirit of the event and worked with energy and enthusiasm to collect clues and put them together.

‘We were impressed with the number of pupils who avoided the red herrings we set to distract them.’