All-day round of golf raises cash for Jace

TEEING OFF From left,  golfers Scott Ford, Simon Decelis and Gareth Griffiths with Jace Andrews at their golf day fundraiser. Picture: Malcolm Wells (131175-9886)

TEEING OFF From left, golfers Scott Ford, Simon Decelis and Gareth Griffiths with Jace Andrews at their golf day fundraiser. Picture: Malcolm Wells (131175-9886)

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WHEN most people go out for a game of golf, they don’t tend to still be there 13 hours later.

But these three men decided to take on the challenge in a bid to raise money and raise awareness for the National Autistic Society.

It’s all in support of six-year-old Jace Andrews who suffers from autism.

Scott Ford teamed up with old schoolfriends Simon Decelis and Gareth Griffiths to play 54 holes of golf at Portsmouth Golf Centre in Eastern Road, starting at 7am and not finishing until around 8pm.

Scott, 29, said: ‘The first 18 holes we sailed through but the second we had a battle.

‘As soon as we started the last 18 we had got over it. We were trying our hardest to get a good score.

‘It was absolutely tiring. We didn’t realise until we stopped how much our feet hurt. I have got a bit of sunstroke too. I’m tired and sore.’

But Scott said it was all worthwhile raising money in support of Jace. Knowing Jace and knowing the difficulties that autism brings, I can understand and I am grateful that there’s a lot of help for autistic kids. So it’s just something to give back.’

Jace attends Milton Park Primary School where there is a special autism provision.

His mum Amy Scott, 29, from Highbury, has also raised money for the charity by holding a fundraising event at the school. Around £400 has been raised from both events.

She said: ‘It’s challenging for him. It really did hold him back at school because we did try and get him in a mainstream school to begin with and it didn’t work.

‘He was getting really upset and anxious and just getting stressed about the amount of children in the classroom.

‘He had to have one-to-one support all the time. Now he’s in a much more relaxed environment.

‘He’s meeting national curriculum level and in certain subjects he’s above what he should be. The unit has really brought him on.’

Amy said she’s thrilled that she has had support to raise money for the charity.

‘I’m grateful that they have gone out and done it. It’s great,’ she said. The fact that from friends and family and work colleagues that we have been able to get that amount of money, is just brilliant.’

Visit autism.org.uk for more information.

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