Bedhampton pensioner invents device to help with wifes’ mobility

James Taylor at his desk in his office at 116 High Street, Old Portsmouth.

Those halcyon days when pen and paper just worked!

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A CREATIVE mind never stops working, and this was the case for a retired scientist from Bedhampton.

Bryan Cox, 88, was faced with a dilemma after his wife Jean had suffered a number of falls, resulting in her having to have two hip replacements and needing to use a wheelchair.

Bryan, who himself has been using a mobility scooter for several years after age had taking its toll on his leg, which had been shattered in a motorbike accident, was unable to move his wife’s chair more than a few metres.

The retired scientist spent most of his life inventing things and problem-solving, and came up with the idea of converting his mobility scooter and Jean’s wheelchair into a motorized tandem.

After some trial and error, Bryan finally had a successful linking mechanism and the couple, who have been married for 64 years, took their new invention out for a test drive.

Bryan said: ‘I was confident there was a solution to our problem, so I set about finding one quickly.

‘I knew that the result needed to be easily fitted and removed for transport, but needed to be safe and secure if I was going to be towing Jean.’

The system uses a pair of strong locking clasps and a pivoting mechanism which enables the pair to turn with ease.

The lightweight attachment can be easily fitted and removed within two minutes.

Bryan managed to make the helpful device with locally purchased materials for less than £20.

The couple are still able to enjoy days out, thanks to Bryan’s helpful invention, as they can pack it up into the boot of their car.

Jean, who is unable to use a scooter due to her being partially paralysed in her left arm, said: ‘The best part is we can unhook, fold up my chair and go further afield.’

So far the couple have stuck to outings in the local park – the real test will be taking the device for a spin in a busy pedestrianised area.

At 88 years old, Bryan said he had no plans to stop problem-solving.