Brothers race with blindfolds for eye charity

READY TO RUN Donna and Matt Harrison and their children George and Jack who will be running blindfold to raise cash for a Kenyan project. Picture: Mick Young (132824-03)

READY TO RUN Donna and Matt Harrison and their children George and Jack who will be running blindfold to raise cash for a Kenyan project. Picture: Mick Young (132824-03)

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KIND-HEARTED brothers Jack and George Harrison know a problem when they see one.

The pair were so moved after learning of people in Kenya unable to see suffering with cataracts that they decided to help a sight-saving charity.

And to highlight their cause Jack, four, and George, eight, of Kelvin Grove, Portchester, will run the Great South Run mini event on Saturday blindfolded for almost a mile (1.5km).

George, a Year 4 pupil at Wickham Primary School, said: ‘We’re aiming to raise £500, our first aim was £100 and we’ve already raised £265.’

The eight-year-old, who has done the annual run twice before but never with a blindfold on, added he was excited for the race.

‘It’s going to be 100 per cent harder,’ he said.

‘We’ve been on two runs round the block to practise for it.

‘It was hard because I felt like I was going round and round.’

The pair’s uncle works in Kenya for the London School of Tropical Medicine, performing cataract operations.

But it needs extra cash to help people who turn up for treatment as it has limited resources for those who are in its project.

It costs £40 to carry out the cataract treatment, from start to finish – meaning the caring brothers have already raised enough to help save six people’s sight.

George’s brother Jack, four, added: ‘It’s going to be hard because I’ve got a blindfold on.

‘Mummy and daddy are going to hold my hand. I’m going to go very quickly.’

Mum Donna, 36 and dad Matt, 35, will lead the brothers so they make it round the course in Southsea without any trips.

Donna added: ‘We were all quite inspired to come home and try and do something and then the mini-Great South Run seemed good to get the kids involved.’

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